Flathead Lake, Montana

Shortly after leaving Coeur d’Alene we wound up at a new lake called Flathead Lake. Flathead lake is in Montana and is the largest freshwater lake west of the Mississippi river. As I have said before I don’t really care about all that but I know you humans sure seem to.

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 14

There were some great scents around here and I could smell the perfect stick. I wasn’t entirely sure where is was but I could tell it was around here somewhere. I wound up getting a little sidetracked by this bush here.

http://youtu.be/gvG1_2y60VE

Then I got the scent of that stick again.

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 2

Well I found the stick and you’ll never guess what happened. Not ten seconds after finding the stick Mama walks right over and takes it. I’m fine with taking sticks from other dogs when I want them but that was my stick.

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 9

Then she starts taunting me with it asking “do you want the stick?” Obviously I wanted the stick that is why I spent so much time looking for it. I don’t want some other stick I wanted that one.

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 11

So what does she do when I make sure she knows I clearly want it? That’s right, she throws it in the water!

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 6

This water is very clear so at least I can see where I’m stepping.

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 3

I put a paw in to check the temperature and decide to go for it.

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 12

As you can see below as soon as I tried to go out and grab it a bunch of waves started attacking me so I tried another route and started to look for a way around. I never did find one though.

http://youtu.be/gq-j2BlBtcA?t=9s

After my struggle Papa finally went out and got the stick for me. I thought the ordeal was over and they were going to stop messing with me. Instead he walked right up to me and showed me my beloved stick while waving it around. Then he throws it in the water again!

It didn’t go as far out this time though and I felt the courage to go get it for myself welling up inside me. This was it. I went for it.

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 13

I got out and then realized I lost track of the stick while I was gathering my courage. I had to look around for a bit.

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 5

Then a new dilemma; how do I pick it up without submerging my face in this frigid water?

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 4

After batting at it with my paw for awhile I realized that wasn’t going to work and I was just going to have to use my mouth. I got to thinking thumbs would be great right about then.

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 8

I heard Mama and Papa cheering me on as I grabbed my stick between my teeth and started to head to shore.

Guillermo Flathead Lake Playing in the water 10

I had done it! I overcame my fear and came out unscathed. I could tell Mama and Papa were very proud of me. It was then that I realized why they were taunting me with MY stick.

With my self confidence high we played the throw the stick in the water game for quite awhile. Throw the stick in the water has now become one of my favorite games.

That time at Flathead Lake really opened me up for new play opportunities. That day sure opened up possibilities with other dogs during our travels. Like the time I played with the Corgi named Poke (pronounced Poki) in Yellowstone. That story coming soon.

Until next time humans!

Coeur d’Alene (Mudgy & Millie Moose Trail)

Awhile back we went and hiked the Mudgy & Millie Moose Trail. I would have told you about it sooner but Papa is lazy. Getting him to edit my work can sure be exhausting! I’m just going to jump right in and tell you about the time we stopped in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho.

Guillermo Coeur d'Alene 8, Mudgy & Millie Moose Trail

First order of business was parking and then making our way around all the construction to actually get to the Mudgy & Millie Moose Trail. We found Mudgy along the way and he gave us directions down to the water.

Millie was nowhere to be found though. Upon inspection of the map we discovered she was over in another part of the park that we were not headed to.

Mudgy and Millie have to stay in different areas of the park because you humans are getting lost all the time and they have to give you directions. It must be difficult for Mudgy and Millie to never get to be near each other.

Guillermo Coeur d'Alene 2, Mudgy & Millie Moose Trail

Here I am with Mudgy.

As you can see I was already getting pretty hot and we hadn’t even gone very far. So we headed to look for some shade.

Guillermo Coeur d'Alene 3Along the trail we found this shaded grassy area perfect for a little scent exchange.

Guillermo Coeur d'Alene 4

Here I am on my Instagram page rolling around and knocking over Mama and Papa’s Coffee.

Now that I was done cooling off and spilling the coffee, it was time for some exploring! There was water and floating cars through this hole I found.

Guillermo Coeur d'Alene 5The Mudgy & Millie Moose Trail has a few parts to it. Some are in the city on roads but as for me and my humans we like going into nature.

Guillermo Coeur d'Alene 10, Mudgy & Millie Moose TrailThe trail winds along the bank of Lake Coeur d’Alene and is actually pretty high up in most places. The views are beautiful and not far along the trail I overheated again per usual and needed to stop for water.

Guillermo Coeur d'Alene 11 So then…

Guillermo Coeur d'Alene 9Just some people.. So then Mama and Papa decided this rock was the perfect photo op and made me sit on this rock and told me to smile. People walking by are always laughing when they see me smiling for a picture they don’t seem to get that I’m just hot and trying to cool off… It does make for a good picture though if I do say so myself.

Guillermo Coeur d'Alene 7By the end of the Mudgy & Millie Moose Trail I must have stopped for water about five or six times but I can’t count so I’m not really sure.

Finally Papa decided keeping me cool was a lot of work and lured me down to the water. Then he picked me up and dropped me in. Normally I would have gone crazy when dropped in water but just weeks earlier I had learned the joys of water in Spokane, as you can see here. Now I even run into the ocean and attack the waves, but that is another post.

Guillermo Coeur d'Alene 12, Mudgy & Millie Moose TrailWith that Mudgy & Millie Moose Trail came to a head and not a moment too soon because I was tired. So after a nice shake to dry off it was time to head back to the Magic House and eat some grub.

Guillermo Coeur d'Alene 6Until next time humans….

Mesa Verde National Park (Cliff Palace and Balcony House)

Hey everybody, things have finally gotten back to normal. While I was in the middle of a two part update about Mesa Verde National Park (Cliff Palace and Balcony House) then my editor started slacking.

Papa wasn’t around much this summer and that made updating very difficult. He was constantly on about a summer job with Ivey Performance Marketing in Milwaukie, Oregon and being extremely busy while in Oregon. I think he was just being lazy, and I know lazy!

Finally Time for a Nap

So now that I have my editor back I can get to regular updates again!

Where was I seems so long ago now. The trip to Cliff Palace and Balcony House was a different situation from the normal.

Not only could I not go, National Park and all that, but Mama couldn’t either.

Mama was in a horrible accident about four and a half years ago and there are certain activities that can cause her pain and they had read there were some real tough spots so Papa did this on his own to bring pictures back for the both of us.

Mesa Verde National Park

The way down to Cliff Palace was made a bit more accessible to the humans of current days. Not too much though, there are places I could get up if I wanted to. Like this place down there for instance.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses 2

What Papa was told was that there are these little holes that the Native Pueblo Indians would use to Climb down there! Reminds me of the time back at Arizona Hot Spings, the time I almost died.

Now Cliff Palace has some stairs and ladders to get down from up top.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses 3

As they moved in closer it was far more apparent how impressive these dwellings are. These people using nothing more than handmade tools and some serious athletic ability were able to make this place in the side of the cliff.

On top of that they farmed up on the plains. So these guys were in and out of these daily. Papa learned about the two sentry towers on either side to watch for intruders.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses

Here is another one of those Kiva homes like the ones back at Chaco Culture. These ones were smaller but they used the same architecture as the others that lived 143 miles away.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses Kiva

After Cliff Palace Papa went to the tour over at Balcony House. There was a walkway for a little bit but then things got hairy.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses Path

Make note to remember this guy.

Along the path they stopped at another Kiva for a lesson about the Kivas again.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses Kiva 2

The Ranger gave a very informative talk about the native Pueblos and how they did things. Did you know that by the time they were 30 they were considered elders? The reason is that they didn’t live as long in this harsh environment.

The Pueblos teeth were filed down because of the powdered rock that they got with every meal of Maze. The Maze was ground between two special stones creating a mixture of powdered rock and corn. It wasn’t ideal but it was the only option they had at this time.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses Ranger Tour

The time to climb back out had come and the first thing was to go up this little ladder and up the little walkway on the upper right. Not so bad I could jump up there.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses Ladder Replica

Just around the corner there was a perfect doggy door for me to get through. Papa never said anything but when I saw this I thought the Pueblos must have loved dogs to make such an easy passage for them.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses Doorway

I quickly learned I was wrong. Right after the doggy door they had to climb up this. I started to think that the dog idea was ridiculous.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses Path Out

Here is what is waiting just after that! I was definitely wrong about the dogs…

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses Ladder Out

Impressive side note though, this guy is 93 and went through the whole thing! Good on you Sir! It is great seeing someone still out enjoying life at his age.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses Ladder Out 2

Once up this ladder there was a great view and you could see down to the bottom of the ladder.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff Houses 4

Finally after all that climbing Papa and his new friends were all right back at their cars. With a great view over the canyon. Everyone went their separate ways. I knew as soon as Papa was coming home like we dogs always do. I woke up and let Mama know Papa was en route.

Mesa Verde National Park Cliff

So finally the pack was back together and hearing about those Cliff dwellings was amazing! You humans never cease to amaze me.

Until next time!

Chaco Culture (New Mexico)

A few weeks back Mama, Papa and I went to a place in the middle of nowhere called Chaco Culture National Historical Park. Though I wasn’t actually able to get into the ruins, again, we had great trip that was like looking back in time.

The drive didn’t seem long but I was asleep most of the way so I could be wrong. (Oh, Papa tells me I was wrong.)

Through the desertThe road was desolate and for miles nothing could be seen. That is, until we came across some beautiful wild horses.

I remember the first time I met a horse I was hiking with Papa up in Oregon when we walked up behind two of them. I didn’t know what to do with these huge creatures so I kept my distance until Papa made me walk right past them. Can you imagine my small stature looking up at a horse…?

Wild HorsesAs we went farther into the middle of nowhere we came across these two buildings. They were the only buildings you could see for miles and seemed long since abandoned.

Desert DwellingsFinally we went through a gate and found the entrance sign to Chaco Culture National Historic Park.

ChacoWe were finally here and ready for an adventure. Alas, this was as close as I would get as again “NO DOGS ALLOWED!”

I’m noticing a theme here about National Parks and that theme is that they do not like animals. At least not the ones that people befriend.

Chaco TrailMama and Papa trekked farther and came across this plaque that tells of the finding and slight restoration efforts that were done once the ruins were unearthed.

Pueblo Bonito They began walking around the outside and around the back of this structure.

Approaching Chaco from the side The architecture here is very different from anything Mama and Papa had ever seen.

Area Closed Beyond SignOnce they were around the backside they went up on a ledge that looked over the whole building. They read that the archaeologists that found this place believe the outer walls were much larger when it was in use.

Chaco View

Saw this lizard

Saw this lizard

This wall here shows the height they suspect the outer wall was all the way around.

Chaco staircaseThese steps lead down to the entrance to the inside of Chaco Culture where humans can walk around and get an up close look at the ruins.

Chaco Culture interiorThis circular room are called Kivas and were used when the people would have important gatherings that involved a family. This is a Great Kiva where many families would gather.

Chaco GatheringBelow is a standard size Kiva. Mama told me these Kivas each represent a family. Meetings and birthing would happen in these as well as many normal daily activities.

A roof would be made by laying wood on the pillars and eventually when enough were stacked it would make for quite the roof. They even had vent holes at the bottom of most of them so the fire and the people could breathe.

Chaco Kiva Moving farther in there were rooms that were finished and most likely used for storage. Though to get through them you had to crouch to enter. Our old neighbor, Dean, who is a Native American up in Oregon told Papa about small doors and Native American culture.

Dean said it is about respect, symbolized birth and is humbling to the person as they came through. Ill intent and negative emotions are to be left at the door. I wonder if the same is true for the people that lived here?

Chaco DoorwayThis is the inside of one of these finished rooms. If you look close you can see someone was nice enough to carve RW into the wood. These look so out of place I can only imagine that someone with no respect came here and decided to blemish this amazing piece of history; too bad really.

I am a dog and you could trust me not to do something like this. Thankfully this was the only defacing they saw here.

Interior Room CeilingFinally when emerging from the other side, the trail had led them full circle and almost back to me. I always know when they are coming to get me and that made me happy.

Chaco wallDesert Frenchie

This turned out to be a great trip for Mama and Papa and I got a chance to sit in the shade.

Thank you to Papa’s fourth grade teacher, Mr. Oliver, for recommending we come to Chaco Culture National Historical Park.

Sandia Crest (New Mexico)

Not too long ago while my humans and I were in Albuquerque, New Mexico we went to a place called Sandia Crest. Sandia Crest can be accessed an number of ways from hiking, riding the 2.7 mile tram or driving up the Sandia Crest Byway.

It seems I wasn’t allowed to ride the tram and the hike may have killed me, I’m pretty sure Mama and Papa wouldn’t have be able to make it either but don’t tell them I said that. It turned out the hour long drive from the city was our only way there.

Sandia Crest Peak 2At 10,678 feet above sea level the views are amazing. It was much cooler up there compared to the city; as much as 30 degrees cooler. You can see for over 100 miles in most directions from the top.

We didn’t find much space to move around but the draw to Sandia Crest is the view.

Sandia Crest Peak 4The Sandia Crest House is also located up here at this point and houses a restaurant that serves burgers and houses the visitor center. Unfortunately it was closed so we couldn’t check it out, I doubt I’d be allowed in anyway.

Sandia Crest Peak 3 Pictured above in the view of the city and below you can see the other side of this mountain.

Sandia Crest Peak 8As usual Papa was looking through that black thing he always shoves in my face when they make me sit in random places.

I don’t know what it is about that thing but he seems more fascinated with it than I am with bones. He never chews on it so it can’t be that cool; to each their own I guess…

Jessica

Mama held Papa’s hat for him while he fiddled with that black thing.

Sandia Crest Peak 6 Sandia Crest Peak 7 Although the views were breathtaking I found myself more interested in the black squawking birds flying overhead.

CrowThe birds seems to be circling this rock as though they were looking for something. I assume it was some tasty critter.

Sandia Crest Peak 5Mama, Papa and I wound up having a great day. Though the Sandia Peak Tram sounded like a lot of fun it was pretty expensive and my family always wants me with them.

If you ever find yourself in Albuquerque, New Mexico do yourself a favor and check out Sandia Crest you will not be disappointed.